Children’s Health

Reviewed by Emily Henderson, B.Sc.Oct 9 2020 Neuroscientists have found new evidence that learning to play an instrument may be good for the brain. Musically trained children perform better at attention and memory recall and have greater activation in brain regions related to attention control and auditory encoding, executive functions known to be associated with
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Reviewed by Emily Henderson, B.Sc.Oct 9 2020 CooperVision is reporting the latest findings from its landmark MiSight® 1 day clinical study, providing new insights about myopia management and the proven efficacy of the specially designed contact lens. Among many powerful outcomes are that nearly one in four children’s eyes originally fit with MiSight® 1 day
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Oct 9 2020 A natural treatment for an antibiotic-resistant bacterial infection that causes blindness in infants can be effectively administered through a simple eye drop without causing irritation, Kingston University researchers have found. A research team from Kingston University has been exploring the potential of antimicrobial agent monocaprin as an alternative to antibiotic treatments for
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Reviewed by Emily Henderson, B.Sc.Oct 9 2020 Rotavirus (RV) is an extremely contagious viral infection and the most common cause of diarrhea in infants and children worldwide. The World Health Organization reports that more than 215,000 children under the age of 5 die of a vaccine-preventable rotavirus infection each year. An RV vaccine, introduced in
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Reviewed by Emily Henderson, B.Sc.Oct 9 2020 Researchers with the Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine and University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center (UHCMC) have secured $4 million in funding from the National Institutes of Health (NIH)/National Cancer Institute (NCI) to establish an HIV-associated Malignancy Research Center (HAMRC) focused on lung cancer in East Africa.
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Reviewed by Emily Henderson, B.Sc.Oct 9 2020 People who survive serious COVID-19 infections have long-lasting immune responses against the virus, according to a new study led by researchers at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH). The study, published in Science Immunology, offers hope that people infected with the virus will develop lasting protection against reinfection. The study
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Reviewed by Emily Henderson, B.Sc.Oct 8 2020 Pregnant women with severe or critical COVID-19 and their unborn infants face increased health risks before and after delivery, a Rutgers study finds. Meanwhile, the study, published in the American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, also found that pregnant women with mild cases of coronavirus disease 2019 had
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A new study published on the preprint server medRxiv* in October 2020 shows that recognizing the differences in the population composition, connectedness and distribution, as well as inter-individual differences in immunity, susceptibility and infectivity, are crucial to estimating the herd immunity attained as a result of natural severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) more
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By Emily Henderson, B.Sc.Oct 7 2020 Thought LeadersDr. Gina PoeProfessorUniversity of California, Los Angeles In this interview, Dr. Gina Poe from UCLA speaks to News-Medical about why we sleep, and the importance of REM sleep for brain development. Sleep is critical to our everyday health. What provoked your research into sleep? We carried out this
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Reviewed by Emily Henderson, B.Sc.Oct 6 2020 Boys and girls who experience puberty earlier than their peers have an increased risk of self-harm in adolescence, a study funded by the National Institute for Health Research Bristol Biomedical Research Centre (NIHR Bristol BRC) and published in the journal Epidemiology & Psychiatric Sciences today [Tuesday 6 October]
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Reviewed by Emily Henderson, B.Sc.Oct 6 2020 A University of Queensland-led team of international researchers says supercharged “clones” of the bacteria Streptococcus pyogenes are to blame for the resurgence of the disease, which has caused high death rates for centuries. UQ’s Dr Stephan Brouwer said health authorities globally were surprised when an epidemic was detected
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Reviewed by Emily Henderson, B.Sc.Oct 6 2020 The coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic has caused widespread harm to the health and well-being of already vulnerable children and adolescents in the U.S., particularly those in low-income households and children of color. Nevertheless, evidence-based programs known to reverse the negative effects of poverty are being widely neglected, according to
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