Month: April 2021

Image: Shutterstock IN THIS ARTICLE ‘What’s in a name?’ is an expression in popular parlance, but we know well enough the effect one’s name has on people. When someone has an exotic or foreign-sounding name, which is also difficult to pronounce, it piques the curiosity. It can also be a conversation starter in many situations,
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Researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine have discovered one way in which SARS-CoV-2, the coronavirus that causes COVID-19, hijacks human cell machinery to blunt the immune response, allowing it to establish infection, replicate and cause disease. In short, the virus’ genome gets tagged with a special marker by a human enzyme
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Using ultra-high field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to map the brains of people with Down syndrome (DS), researchers from Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland Clinic, University Hospitals and other institutions detected subtle differences in the structure and function of the hippocampus–a region of the brain tied to memory and learning. Such detailed mapping, made possible
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Researchers at Karolinska Institutet and the Public Health Agency of Sweden have studied newborn babies whose mothers tested positive for SARS-CoV-2 during pregnancy or childbirth. The results show that although babies born of test-positive mothers are more likely to be born early, extremely few were infected with COVID-19. The study, which is published in the
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Image: Shutterstock IN THIS ARTICLE Children love to play and are curious to explore new things. They also start developing cognitively from a young age (1). Exposing them to different activities will help them play and learn at the same time. Several childhood activities enhance various skills in children. All you need to do is
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Researchers have created a new, open-access tool that allows doctors and scientists to evaluate infant brain health by assessing the concentration of various chemical markers, called metabolites, in the brain. The tool compiled data from 140 infants to determine normal ranges for these metabolites. Published in the journal NMR in Biomedicine, the study describes an
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After more than a year of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, it has become clear that children are less susceptible to the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), both in terms of the number of infections and the severity of illness. However, some children do develop severe disease as well as a host
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Timestamps 00:33 Cool cement planter 02:04 Decoration from a broken plant pot 04:56 Planter hangers from old T-shirts 06:27 How a diaper can help a plant —————————————————————————————- Subscribe to 5-Minute MAGIC: http://bit.ly/2ldditZ 5-Minute Crafts: https://www.goo.gl/8JVmuC Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/5min.crafts/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/5.min.crafts/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/5m_crafts Subscribe to 5-Minute Crafts GIRLY: https://goo.gl/fWbJqz Subscribe to 5-Minute Workouts: https://goo.gl/67owiQ The Bright Side
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The incidence of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) transmission from mothers to newborns appears low and may be linked to biological as well as social factors. However, studies focusing on the factors associated with neonatal viral testing outcomes. Test positivity rate and health outcomes of maternal SARS-CoV-2 infection among perinatally exposed newborns Recently,
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Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a complex developmental condition that involves challenges in social interaction, nonverbal communication, speech, and repetitive behaviors. In the United States alone, about 1 in 54 children is diagnosed with ASD. Boys are four times more likely to be diagnosed with autism than girls. Early diagnosis is crucial for treatment and
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For the first time in published literature, Le Bonheur Children’s Hospital and University of Tennessee Health Science Center (UTHSC) researchers showed that a variety of white blood cells known as eosinophils modify the respiratory barrier during influenza A (IAV) infection, according to a recent paper in the journal Cells. This research could have implications in
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An intestinal bowel disease that affects up to 10 percent of premature infants at a very vulnerable and developmentally crucial time can lead to serious infection and death. Scientists at the Wake Forest Institute for Regenerative Medicine (WFIRM) are tackling the disease with a human placental-derived stem cell (hPSC) therapy strategy that is showing promising
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